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Laryngeal Paralysis in Dogs

Wheezing? Raspy? Rattling noise? Panting more heavily than usual? Loud panting? Pitch or volume changes to your dog’s bark? Oftentimes, we attribute these stridor and other sounds to old age, allergies, or heat. It could be one of these conditions. The problem is we may become accustomed to the slow progression of changes that actually…

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The Tissue -Pathies of Hypothyroidism and the Controversy

Hypothyroidism can be an effect of, or impetus for, several secondary diseases and dysfunctions. Whether or not hypothyroidism is the singular cause or due to multiple factors depends on the dysfunction in question.  To complicate matters, not all hypothyroid patients develop these secondary diseases and most if not all of these conditions can occur without the presence of thyroid dysfunction.…

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Alopecia X in Dogs

Alopecia X is possibly one of the biggest mysteries in veterinary research medicine these days. We have an idea of what is going on, but continue to circle the wagons around the exact cause or causes.  In fact, I do not want to broach the numerous descriptive names, history of the research, or the current research being conducted,…

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Chasing that wascally wabbit again?

It is pretty darn cute when you hear your companion dog’s muffled bark and wonder what he is dreaming about. (Whether or not dogs dream is still up for debate.) The occasional muffled sleep barking, howling, slight twitching, and paddling are fairly common in most dogs. However, these symptoms are mild on the REM Behavior…

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Essentials for Diagnosing Thyroid Disorders in Dogs #1

Total T4 alone is often misleading · Overdiagnoses hypothyroidism in the presence of non-thyroidal illness or use of certain drugs · Underdiagnoses hyperthyroidism in cats or from thyroxine overdosage · Inaccurately assesses adequacy of thyroxine therapy · Fails to detect autoimmune thyroiditis · Minimal testing is T4 + free T4, except thyroiditis will still not…

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Properly Administering Thyroid Medication to Your Dog

Dr. Dodds cannot emphasize enough how to administer thyroid medication to your dog correctly. Please help spread the word so dogs are on the right dosage and so the medication is working most effectively. Giving Thyroid Medication to Your Companion Dog: – Twice per day – 1 hour before OR 3 hours after feeding –…

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